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Silver Collector Forums

American Sterling Silver Jewelry Box???

[b]
Hi Everyone. Someone told me that this jewelry box is from Edward Ball Company NYC, NY?? Not sure if that’s correct and how much is it worth and the year it was made??
Click on this link to view the jewelry box www.mynetimages.com/album/Gwendolyn/

Thank You,

Gwendolyn[/b]

Hi there - the mark resembles but is not the same as the Edward Ball Co. mark in my books…the books show it as a NYC silversmith in 1918. The fact that the marks contain both the word “sterling” and the number “925” is unusual for American silver. I’ll dig a little deeper, but it may not be American. A clearer picture of the circular mark would be helpful.

Regards,

Uncle Vic

I thought if its American after the 1860’s it will have the word sterling or 925. So could it be after 1860? I thought in other countires they did not used sterling or 925?? Hope you can find where it come from/year/worth?? Someone told me it was American and it dates from 1850 to 1899. I do not know. I am new to this. If you can find any information I will be very thankful!!

Thank You,

Gwendolyn

PS My mother said it look like french…[/b]

When I have the time I will take another photo. Give me few weeks…

Use of “sterling” silver (92.5% silver, 7.5% copper) came into common use in the United States in about 1850 and the word “sterling” began to be applied to goods made from it about the same time. Prior to that time most American silver was “coin silver” or 90% silver, 10% copper. The number “925”, denoting 92.5% purity, was used early on, but usually not along with the word “sterling”, although the use of both is not unheard of.

The widespread use of the number “925” is fairly recent, becoming very popular after about 1970 but mostly on jewelry. In the late 1800s and early 1900s several of the major American makers used the term “925/1000 FINE” and the word “sterling” or “sterling silver” on their goods. Examples are Mauser, Shreve, Theo. B. Starr, and Watson.

Your item is probably not French as they seldom used “sterling”. Its value depends on the maker and the weight. You can scan the “completed items” on ebay and get an idea of what similar items are bringing.

Again, a good sharp close-up of the circular mark will go a long way in helping to identify the maker.

Regards,

Uncle Vic

Thanks for the information. I will take a clear and close up photo of the mark soon. Can you take a guess what year it could be?

If it turns out to be Edward Ball it dates from about 1918. I can tell more when I see the clear picture of the mark.

Regards,

Uncle Vic

Hi. I try to take a clear photo of that mark and the photo is not coming out clear. I do not know what else to do. I am hoping you can do the research and help me with finding the maker.

Hi Uncle Vic. I came across this website and it has the same sterling silver jewelry box and it say its early french sterling silver box caddy. Not sure if its American or French cause I look at the French hallmarks and it does not match. The website address is www.malleries.com and go to seach box and type in sterling silver box and it will be on the 2nd page. Tell me what you think…

It is similar to yours. I’m still not sure about the origin of yours, but probably not French from the marks, but the style is really not American. Perhaps some of our readers have some ideas?

Regards,

Uncle Vic

Hi Uncle Vic,

You did ask for some ideas and the following is probably not a good one but I’ll throw it out there anyway. How about Mexican. The style and making seem more in line with a piece from Mexico and pieces are often stamped STERLING and I think I’ve seen some with 925 as well. If the circular image is a coiled serpent, this is a motif used regularly in Mexican art. The only other suggestion I have is Scandinavian ie Danish but the style seems wrong. hopefully I’m not being too misleading :slight_smile:

Good luck in your ID search Gwendolyn,

Gerry

Gerry - thanks for your ideas, they are very helpful…Mexican crossed my mind too, but to my eye the piece just does not “look Mexican”, which is about as subjective as you can get! The most beautiful tea/coffee service I have ever laid eyes on was one my wife and I saw at a New York dealer’s shop a few years ago…I would have bet the farm it was English…it turned out to be Japanese, so I guess my “eye” is suspect.

Regards,

Uncle Vic