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I found this set of child’s flatware at an antique store a couple of weekends ago. I don’t know anything about them, the lady that sold this to me didn’t know anything about them either…there’s one spoon and fork and 2 knives. The mark on all the untensils is WB over W. If anyone can assist me in gaining some knowledge, i would greatly appreciate it! I don’t even know if these are silver or what, the only other set on the internet i can find with the WB over W mark is Malabar Plated and on 1900’s childrens flatware.
Thank you so very much!

Little Nemo is the main fictional character in a series of weekly comic strips by Winsor McCay (1871-1934) that appeared in the New York Herald and William Randolph Hearst’s New York American newspapers from October 15, 1905 – April 23, 1911 and April 30 1911–1913; respectively. The strip was first called Little Nemo in Slumberland and then In the Land of Wonderful Dreams when it changed papers. A brief revival of the title occurred from

Although a comic strip, it was far from a simple children’s fantasy; it was often dark, surreal, threatening, and even violent. The strip related the dreams of a little boy: Nemo (meaning “nobody” in Latin), the hero. The last panel in each strip was always one of Nemo waking up, usually in or near his bed, and often being scolded (or comforted) by one of the grownups of the household after crying out in his sleep and waking them. In the earliest strips, the dream event that woke him up would always be some mishap or disaster that seemed about to lead to serious injury or death, such as being crushed by giant mushrooms, being turned into a monkey, falling from a bridge being held up by “slaves”, or gaining 90 years in age. The adventures leading to these disasters all had a common purpose: to get to Slumberland, where he had been summoned by King Morpheus, to be the “playmate” of his daughter, the Princess.

Hope this helps

Little Nemo is the main fictional character in a series of weekly comic strips by Winsor McCay (1871-1934) that appeared in the New York Herald and William Randolph Hearst’s New York American newspapers from October 15, 1905 – April 23, 1911 and April 30 1911–1913; respectively. The strip was first called Little Nemo in Slumberland and then In the Land of Wonderful Dreams when it changed papers. A brief revival of the title occurred from

Although a comic strip, it was far from a simple children’s fantasy; it was often dark, surreal, threatening, and even violent. The strip related the dreams of a little boy: Nemo (meaning “nobody” in Latin), the hero. The last panel in each strip was always one of Nemo waking up, usually in or near his bed, and often being scolded (or comforted) by one of the grownups of the household after crying out in his sleep and waking them. In the earliest strips, the dream event that woke him up would always be some mishap or disaster that seemed about to lead to serious injury or death, such as being crushed by giant mushrooms, being turned into a monkey, falling from a bridge being held up by “slaves”, or gaining 90 years in age. The adventures leading to these disasters all had a common purpose: to get to Slumberland, where he had been summoned by King Morpheus, to be the “playmate” of his daughter, the Princess.

Hope this helps

I’m not sure if you have found out anything on your set or not. I’m researching the same set and can’t find anything on it…Please advise if you have found out any information at all on it. I notice yours has a pink lining in the box and mine has a blue lining.

Still have found nothing pertaining to Little Nemo :cry: